News Doc Review – You Won’t Believe It!

 News Doc Review – Read for Pay?

I just felt like using a clickbait headline todayPerhaps it will help people avoid sites like News Doc, which offer to pay you for reading news articles.  Paid news sites aren’t revolutionary; they’ve been around for a while, but not for as long as the sites that offer paid surveys.  The premise is the same – the site tells you they’ll pay you if you’ll do something for them.  In the case of News Doc, the task is a simple one.  You just have to read a short news article and they’ll pay you $7.  That may not sound like much, but they’ll allow you to read up to 35 articles per day, and that adds up.

news doc reviewWhy does News Doc do this?  They claim that news agencies are looking for readers and that they’ll pay people to send readers their way.  News Doc, good people that they are, claim to share 80% of that revenue with people who come to their site to read news articles.  That sounds like a pretty good deal, especially since reading a news article on the site takes less than ten seconds.  You can read 35 articles per day and that won’t take you more than about 15 or 20 minutes, making News Doc a pretty fast way to earn money, too.  Is Doc News on the level or is it just another scam?  Read on for our full News Doc review.

News Doc Overview

To get started at News Doc, you just need to sign up.  You give them an email address and a password and you’re signed up and logged in.  Then you click the Read News link at the top of the page.  You’ll see a page with a listing of news articles, along with the time that they were posted on the site and how much you’ll earn for reading each one.  When I checked out the News Doc site, the price per article as $7.  To read an article, just click on it.  You’ll see a headline and a short article, and when I say “short”, I mean about two sentences at the most.  Click “confirm” when you’re done and you’ll be asked to answer a short math problem to prove that you’re not a human.  Once you’ve done that, you’ll have $7 added to your News Doc account balance.  You can repeat this up to 35 times per day, for total earnings of $245 daily.

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To get paid, you click on the “Finance” link.  You have to provide your account information for PayPal, Payza or Skrill in order to get paid, and your account balance must be at least $2300 to qualify.  Furthermore, you’ll have to wait 14 days for payment.   The site says that you can reduce the 14 day period to 0 if you refer five friends to the site.  They give you a special link to use for that.   That link has another purpose, too – News Doc says that if you refer friends to the site, you’ll get $35 for each one you refer, plus you’ll get 15% of their earnings when they read news articles.  That’s another $36.75 per day that you can potentially earn from each friend that you refer.  That means that you could possibly earn thousands of dollars every week if you refer a number of friends to the site.

news doc scamAs usual, when something sounds easy and fast and profitable, two of the three things are probably wrong.  That’s the case with News Doc, and there are a number of things about News Doc that just don’t make sense.  Why would news agencies pay people to read their news?  Have you ever had anyone offer to pay you to read a newspaper or magazine?  Of course not; news agencies sell those things because that’s what they’re in business to do.  They sell news.  They don’t pay people to take it.  Yet here is News Doc, telling us that the news agencies are paying to get readers for their articles.

OK, perhaps they are.  Surely there are links in these short articles to the real news sites, where we can read the full article and perhaps click on an ad or something that would make money for the news agencies, right?  No, there’s nothing like that.  In fact, there’s no indication in any of the articles as to where you might find the rest of the article or any clues as to where the article even came from.  There’s just a headline and a sentence or two, and that’s that.

There’s one other thing that’s strange about News Doc.  They claim that they’ve been in business since 2014 and that they’re based in New York.  I did a quick WHOIS lookup to see who owns the site and where they are located.  The site is privately registered through a registrar in Russia.  The IP address for the site traces to Ukraine.  The domain name was registered in mid-2015, so the site is brand new.

news doc ripoffHere’s the part of the review that always makes waves in the comments section.  The worst part of News Doc is this – News Doc will not pay you.  They’re not going to pay you today, tomorrow, in two weeks, in two months, or ever.  They don’t pay.  This is not only true of News Doc, but it’s also true of all of the other sites owned by this company, and there are dozens of them.  I’ve reviewed most of these sites, and when I say they don’t pay, people will write in the comments, “Did you try?  Did you earn $2300 and wait 14 days?”

No, I did not.  I did that for their first site, and that was three months ago and I still haven’t been paid.   haven’t bothered with any of the others and you shouldn’t either.  News Doc is either stealing email addresses or trying to hack PayPal accounts or just trying to get clicks on ads.  What they’re not doing is paying people to read news.

Don’t get scammed:Download 10 scam-free ways to make money working from home, plus 10 tips on how to avoid work from home scams.

News Doc Summary

Is News Doc a scam?  Yes, News Doc is a scam.  You’re not going to get paid, and you might get your PayPal account hacked.  If I were you, I wouldn’t bother.  If you’re genuinely interested in making money online, you should skip News Doc and visit Wealthy Affiliate instead.  It’s a training program that will show you how to make money online using methods that actually work. That’s better than reading articles at News Doc and hoping they pay you, which they aren’t going to do.

News Doc is not recommended.

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